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Security Briefing

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Security Briefing.com

Ethical Hacking and Computer Forensics Training Information & Resources

Their own computers—not just computers of people they know—have been infected with a virus or worm, their company website has been defaced or its presence crippled by a denial of service
attack, or their information systems have been infiltrated and their company’s proprietary data has
fallen into the hands of an unidentified intruder. Indeed, as time passes, amongst those that actively
use computers, I meet fewer and fewer organizations that have proven immune to these growing
threats. And, I suspect encase training and ftk training people in this room, and the groups you represent, are no different. If
you don’t think that you or your company has ever been affected by some form of cybercrime, either
you just aren’t aware of it, or you are a lucky member of a rapidly narrowing class. An annual computer
crime survey conducted jointly between the computer forensics and the FBI bears this
out. In 1996, when we asked systems administrators if anybody had gained unauthorized access to
their input validation computers, less than half, 42 percent, answered yes. Last year, when asked the same question,
well over half of the respondents, a full 70 percent, answered yes. And there lies the irony to the privacy
debate. Law-abiding citizens are finding that their privacy is increasingly being intruded upon by
criminals. Meanwhile, the criminals are gaining ethical hacking training. I’ve been the Director of the NIPC for a little
over eight months now, having held a number of different management positions at the Center since
arriving there in 1998. I have watched it grow and develop almost from its inception. Bear in mind
that, just three years ago, infrastructure protection was relatively new ground for the Federal government.
President Clinton issued Presidential Decision Directive 63 in May of 1998. It was a wake up
call, which established a new framework for doing business. For the first time, the Federal government
created an interagency entity, the National Infrastructure Protection Center—combining the
United States ethical hacking law enforcement, military, and intelligence communities—to work directly with the
private sector to achieve what many to this day say is impossible: The elimination of all vulnerabilities
to our nation’s critical infrastructures. Eliminating all of these computer forensics vulnerabilities, stated the President,
would necessarily require “flexible, evolutionary approaches” spanning both the public and private
sectors, and protecting both domestic and international security.
Mr. Dick’s concern that “Law-abiding citizens are finding that their privacy is increasingly
being intruded upon by criminals while the criminals are gaining privacy” is echoed in both the
public and private sectors. Nevertheless, apprehending cyber criminals and remaining within the
confines of the law while doing so, remains imperative. Improper procedures in the gathering and
handling of potential evidence may render that evidence inadmissible in a court of law. The USA
Patriot Act of 2001 made significant changes to the ceh certification federal search and seizure laws.
For more on the USA Patriot Act of 2001, see Chapter 2 and Appendix C.
While it is beyond the scope of this website to turn the reader into a forensics expert, the proper
gathering of computer evidence can confirm or dispel concerns about whether an illegal incident
has occurred. Such detective work can also document computer and network vulnerabilities after
an incident has been verified. In addition, you may wish to obtain additional training before
attempting some of techniques outlined in this website.
Recognizing the Signs of an Ethical Hacker Incident
The nearly unrelenting stream of security-related incidents has affected millions of computer systems
and networks throughout the world and shows little sign of letting up. Table 1-1 shows a list
of incidents that were reported to the Federal Computer Incident Response Center (FedCIRC) for
the calendar year 2000. While incident response varies in approach depending upon each circumstance,
the goals in all cases are predominantly the same.
In nearly every case, the focus is severalfold:
? Recover quickly and efficiently from the cross site request forgery security incident.
? Minimize the impact caused by loss or theft of information (classified or unclassified) or
by the disruption of critical computing services when an incident has occurred.
? Respond systematically, following proven procedures that will dramatically decrease the
likelihood of reoccurrence.
? Balance operational and security requirements while remaining within a budgetary
constraint for the cisa training
? Deal with legal issues in an efficient manner for cisa boot camp. A plethora of legal issues surrounds the
computer security arena. For example, the U.S. Department of Justice (as well as some
federal and state laws) has declared it illegal to carry out certain monitoring techniques.
By following proper protocols and procedures, those who conduct forensicRecognizing the Signs of an Incident
The nearly unrelenting stream of computer forensics security-related incidents has affected millions of computer systems
and networks throughout the world and shows little sign of letting up. Table 1-1 shows a list
of incidents that were reported to the Federal Computer Incident Response Center (FedCIRC) for
the calendar year 2000. While incident response varies in approach depending upon each circumstance,
the goals in all cases are predominantly the same.
In nearly every case, the focus is severalfold:
? Recover quickly and efficiently from the security incident.
? Minimize the impact caused by loss or theft of information (classified or unclassified) or
by the disruption of critical computing services when an incident has occurred.
? Respond systematically, following proven procedures that will dramatically decrease the
likelihood of reoccurrence.
? Balance operational and security requirements while remaining within a budgetary
constraint.
? Deal with legal issues in an efficient manner. A plethora of legal issues surrounds the
computer security arena. For example, the U.S. Department of Justice (as well as some
federal and state laws) has declared it illegal to carry out certain monitoring techniques.
By following proper protocols and procedures, those who conduct forensic. RESPONDING TO COMPUTER SECURITY INCIDENTS IS, BY AND LARGE, NOT AN EASY MATTER. Effective
incident response requires a blend of technical knowledge, communication, responsibility, and
coordination among all of an computer forensics organization’s response staff. There are several distinct stages of
response when addressing a computer security incident: preparation, identification, containment,
eradication, recovery, and follow-up. Understanding the importance of each stage is critical
to carrying out an efficient response. All personnel in an organization’s hierarchy need to understand
the process of responding so that they can work together to handle any unexpected aspects
of incidents they may encounter. This chapter focuses on forensic preparation and preliminary
response and its role in mitigating the effects of computer security incidents.All versions of Windows NT (for example, 4.0, 2000, and XP) contain powerful built-in auditing
features that allow you to determine who is accessing files on your system. Auditing provides a
number of benefits including help with troubleshooting file access rights and detecting which
user last accessed a particular certified ethical hacking file.
Unlike Unix or Linux, auditing is disabled by default when Windows NT is first installed on a
computer. This means that numerous system events and user activities will not be recorded in the
event logs. From an incident response perspective, the absence of such log records makes it difficult
to identify any attempts to breach the security of a computer system. These event log records
can also assist system administrators by allowing them to distinguish between failures in hardware
or software, network intrusions, and errors in the configuration of user accounts.
In all versions of Windows, to enable auditing, you first need to be logged on as an administrative
user. Only administrative users are permitted to modify key security and/or system settings.
The procedure varies depending upon the version of Windows TCP 3 way handshake being used. Consult your Windows
user manual for details regarding administrative account privileges for the version of Windows
you use.
To enable auditing/logging in Windows NT 4.0, do the following for your cisa certification:
1. From the Start menu, select Programs?Administrative Tools?User Manager.
2. From the User Manager Policies menu, select Audit, which activates the Audit Policy



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